That appears to be Martin Hasek’s philosophy, the creator of Noteslate, and it appears to be working. I posted about the Noteslate back in January, I was sceptical then and unfortunately my scepticism was founded, as this CNN report confirmed shortly afterwards, but that doesn’t appear to have stopped 64,000 people clicking the like button on their homepage, 10,000 following them on Twitter, plus over 17,000 optimistic hopefuls liking the Noteslate Facebook page (there were only 500 when I hit the like button!), most of which are keen to see a real noteslate in production, although some are flagging a bit now on the Facebook page, and posting negative and frustrated comments.

So why do this? Surely Martin is going to anger a lot of people when he comes 100% clean, or will he? After all he’s proven without doubt that his college industrial design project (apparently that’s where it all started) has a market, one that may make investors very interested in the concept, although without any IP protection, I’m not sure how interested they’d be… although if you do the maths, based on the original price of $100 per unit (highly unlikely), that’s still 90k fans & likes x $100 = $9m… not bad for vapourware! Plus if Noteslate don’t release it, someone else undoubtedly will.

Either way, I’d personally love to see a noteslate type of device, without doubt I’d use it everyday, it dovetails perfectly with our no paper philosophy, we’d certainly look at ways of communicating with it and automating syncing with our own systems.

One thing Noteslate highlights and proves to us at no paper, is that people have no problem imagining a world where they don’t use or rely on paper, of course we’ve believed that for a long time, but it’s nice to know others believe and feel the same!

more dis-information at noteslate

more information at no paper

With Facebook you can “like” something, but with Google you can love it (I wonder how long it will be before McDonald’s sues them?)

It’s not officially launched yet, but try it out for yourself

What do you love?

You should follow me on Twitter here

Getting your message across in an engaging and amusing way, especially when making fun of yourself is a great approach, the agency John St, have done just that. They’ve managed in a subtle way to show that they know what they’re talking about and how with their approach they can help future clients achieve the same results, but rather than showcasing a large campaign, they’re created a client case study of a child’s birthday party!

And of course, the proof is in the pudding, the video is itself becoming viral, genius!

I first saw this in Phil’s Unionversity site.

Smell Like a Monster

November 3, 2010

if you have no idea what this is about then watch the video below

Here’s a wonderful example of grass roots viral marketing, or is it?

when you have a need to get as large an audience or following as possible…

Start by (and the is the hardest part of all) with an original idea, something remarkable

then make it easy for users to pass on links of your product or discuss it, by utilising social media networks

to create as big a buzz as possible try to piggyback off a product or brand that already has a huge buzz and audience who are already talking about it, as yours will benefit immensely from this brand association, in this case the iPhone… but be careful with this, choose your brand association carefully, it needs to be aligned to your own core values and brand proposition, plus don’t get dwarfed, you want people saying how good your product is, not how good your viral marketing idea was!

In this case I think the later may happen, but it’s still a wonderfully inventive idea and should boost Atomic Tom’s recognition and standing (I certainly hope it does)

if you like the tune you can get it on iTunes

via Engadget

Pulse of the Nation

July 27, 2010

I love data visualisation, in fact I was given a wonderful book entitled “Information is Beautiful” by David McCandleless as a present a few days ago… anyway I just stumbled across this on Mashable

The video shows the mood in the U.S., as inferred using over 300 million tweets, over the course of the day. The maps are represented using density-preserving cartograms more info here

Don’t get my wrong, I have nothing against facebook, in fact I think it’s great… but this whole privacy fiasco is becoming a PR nightmare!

A couple of days ago I stumbled across reclaimprivacy.org a fantastic little javascript, that safely scans your privacy settings and warns you of any problems.

But taking a completely different approach youropenbook.org lets you type in a phrase and voila… of it goes rummaging through Facebook users that have left their wall posts a little too public

Less Is More

May 20, 2010

Sometimes too much choice is a bad thing… Facebook’s privacy settings have more options than ordering a coffee in Starbucks! To see what I mean follow this link to the NY Times

A slightly different take on my Networking or Not Working post 😉

his-not-on-facebook

As I’ve re-quoted before “Statistics are like bikinis. What they reveal is suggestive, but what they conceal is vital“ Aaron Levenstein

This video makes compelling reading/watching, but read between the lines, there’s more to this than meets the eye, major changes are unfolding in the social media environment, information/data/ID aggregation is becoming the new hot potato, the shift is about linking you to the stuff you want to know in a transparent & convenient way.

For more info & a list of quotes & stats go to the socialnomics blog

Also check out a brilliant and ballsy presentation by Marta Kagan entitled What the F**K is Social Media: One Year Later

Also note Marta doesn’t use the that annoying Social Media Expert moniker, she calls herself a Bonafide Marketing Genius, now that’s a great job title! (as long as you live up to it of course, although reading her blog, it looks like she does)